The Face of Your Company: Your Delivery Representative

Indicators your delivery rep is doing a good job

1. Let’s say your delivery rep discovers something is missing and has been placed on another vehicle. How can this situation be turned around positively?

They promptly inform the customer, and proactively take necessary steps to ensure the issue is resolved.

They might say: “I apologize, we had a mix up and your [item] is on another delivery vehicle. Someone will be delivering it as quickly as possible. I estimate that it will arrive in [xx] minutes.”

2. Your customers will occasionally let you know: “[Employee name] did a great job getting everything set-up for us. She always takes good care of us.”

3. The representative is consistently in clean uniform, maintains cleanliness of delivery vehicle, checks orders before leaving, and answers all cell calls.

 

Indicators your delivery rep is not doing a good job

1. They say to the customer, “I don’t have time to set-up your order—I have a lot of other deliveries and I am running late. Sorry.”


2. They tend to map their route according to what is most convenient for them rather than what is best for customers.

3. Your rep is seen smoking in or around the delivery vehicle. Delivering fresh, quality food and smoking do not go together.

Three suggestions regarding your delivery rep

1. Have the same representatives deliver to the same companies or area as much as possible. This will give your customers a sense of comfort and strengthens loyalty.

2. Check in with your customers. Ask about the delivery and setup process.

3. Spot-check larger set-ups occasionally. (As in, go to the company and take a look.)

 

Michael Rosman is the CEO of www.thecorporatecaterer.com. If you need more tips, please visit his website or email him.

 

Click on the link below to get the first details about #Catersource 2018!

 

 

 

Michael Rosman

Michael Rosman

Owner/Founder, The Corporate Caterer, Boston, MA

Michael Rosman has over three decades of experience in the catering and restaurant industry. His career began in the management-training program with Creative Gourmets in Boston, where he spent five years working in different corporate dining facilities and catering venues throughout the city. He then purchased an existing café in Boston’s financial district and eventually took ownership of a nearby pizzeria. During this time he began creating the infrastructure for a corporate drop-off catering operation and five years later, he sold his client list to the largest independent catering company in the city.

As Director of Corporate Catering with Via Lago Café and Catering in Lexington, MA, he built an almost two million...